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Genealogy of my Zylstra(Zijlstra),Reitsma, Menzies, Carson, Martin, Palmer, Snyder and McGee ancestors.
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351 Jesse McCALL Bible donated to Lane University Museum, Lecompton, Douglas County, Kansas by Helen PETTIBONE.

Information from Jesse McCALL Bible submitted by Lola L. ALLEN to the Ohio Genealogical Society and was published in the following:

(1) The Ohio Genealogical Society, Bible Record: Jesse McCALL, The Report, Volume 33, Number 02 (Summer 1993), p. 108.

(2) The Ohio Genealogical Society, McCALL Bible - Jesse S/O Moses, Ohio Records & Pioneer Families, Volume XXXIV, Number 02 (1993), p. 88.

(3) The Ohio Genealogical Society, Jesse McCALL Family: Corrections, Ohio Records & Pioneer Families, Volume XXXIV, Number 03, p. 148.
...........................................................................
NOTES: Lola L. ALLEN (Member #2431) joined First Families Of Ohio through her descent from Moses McCALL (Pioneer #7450), Nancy Ann CALHOUN (Pioneer #7451), and Samuel McCALL (Pioneer #7954) in 1991. 
Source: "Delaware Family Group Sheet for Moses McCall Family." Digital images.
 
352 Type any analytical comments about the document, its sources, etc. Source: "OneWorldTree," database, Ancestry.com
 
353 Source Information
Ancestry.com. Washington Births, 1907-1919 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2002.
Original data: Washington State Department of Health. Washington State Births 1907-1919. Washington, USA: Department of Health.
About Washington Births, 1907-1919
Birth registers in Washington were kept on a county level from 1891-1907. The mandatory recording of births and deaths on a state level began 1 July 1907.
This database contains an index to births in Washington from 1907-1919. Some earlier records may also be included. This index was created by and obtained from the Washington Department of Health. There are no images of these records in this database.
Information contained in this database includes:
Name of child
Gender
Birth date
Birthplace
Race
Parents' names
Not all of the above information may be available for every individual listed in this database. The amount of information available for a person varies according to the type of form used as the original record.
Use the information gathered from this database to order a copy of the birth certificate from the Department of Health. Visit the Washington State Department of Health website (http://www.doh.wa.gov/) for more information on how to do that.
Some of the above information was taken from Dwight A. Radford, "Washington," in Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources, 3d ed., ed. Alice Eichholz. (Provo, Utah: Ancestry, 2004). 
Source: "Washington Births, 1907-1919," database, Ancestry.com, Ancestry.com
 
354 Enumeration for the tenth census of the United States began on 1 June 1880. Census enumerators were to complete the enumeration within thirty days. Communities with a population of 10,000 or greater were to be completed within two weeks. June 1, 1880 appears in the heading for individuals "in this family," because all responses were to reflect the individual's status as of that date, even if the status had changed between 1 June and the actual day the family was enumerated. Therefore, children born between June 1 and the actual day of enumeration were not to be listed; people who died between June 1 and the actual day of enumeration were to be listed as alive, etc. However, it is important to note that some enumerators disregarded this instruction. The 1880 census was the first census to identify each individual's relationship to the head of household--proving relationships to family members which could only be guessed in previous censuses. It is also the first census to record the street and house number for urban households and the birthplace (state or country) for the individual's parents. The enumerator also recorded the marital status of each individual, any illness or disability in the family at the time, as well as the number of months an individual was unemployed that year. It is also important to note that Native Americans who were not taxed were enumerated in special Indian schedules. This is the first census where the state or country of birth for parents of every individual is reported. This is especially important for tracing immigrant ancestors and for replacing lost birth records. Other relatives listed with the family in the census can help identify the maiden name of the mother as well as the surnames of married daughters. Cousins, aunts, uncles, grandparents, in-laws, and other family members listed with their relationships give great clues to unraveling the family. Source: 1880 Federal Population Census
 
355 Enumeration for the twelfth census of the United States began on 1 June 1900. Enumerators were to complete it within thirty days. Communities with a population of 10,000 or greater were to be completed within two weeks. June 1, 1900 appears in the heading for many individuals "in this family" because all responses were to reflect the individual's status as of that date, even if the status had changed between 1 June and the actual day of enumeration. Therefore, children born between June 1 and the actual date were not to be listed; people who had died between June 1 and the actual date were to be listed as alive, etc. However, it is important to note that sometimes the enumerator disregarded this instruction. The 1900 census provides the exact month and year of birth for each individual and records the number of years couples were married. It also states how many children had been born to the mother and how many were still living. It also gives the street and house numbers for urban households and the birthplace (state or country) for the parents of each individual. The enumerator also recorded the marital status of each individual, any illness or disability in the family at the time, and the number of months an individual was unemployed for that year. This census also asked about the citizenship status of each individual. If the individual emigrated to the US, the enumerator recorded the year of arrival and the naturalization date if naturalized. This census indicates whether a home or a farm was owned or rented and whether the owned property was free from mortgage. It also stated if the person was a Civil War veteran or the widow of a Civil War veteran. A separate Indian schedule was used to document the tribe or band of Native Americans. If a Native American schedule cannot be located within a county, look at all the schedules for a state. The 1900 census records the date of arrival to the United States, naturalization information, age of individuals and birth place. This recorded information makes this census extremely important for tracing movements of immigrant ancestors as well as supplementing or replacing lost vital records of birth. Other relatives listed with the family in the census can help identify the maiden name of the mother as well as the surnames of married daughters. Cousins, aunts, uncles, grandparents, in-laws, and other family members listed with the relationship, give great clues to unravel the family ties. If the individual was an immigrant and listed a year of immigration on the census, you can begin looking for the ship's passenger list for that individual. Source: 1900 Population Census Schedules
 
356 The actual page of the 1910 Census contains information concerning the family including: name, sex, race, age, relation to head of household, marital status, occupation, birth place of individual, birth place of individual's parents, number of children born to the wife, number of her children still living, language spoken (if English is not first language), whether a Civil War Veteran, immigration and naturalization information, number of weeks unemployed, whether employee or employer, literacy status, any disabilities in the family. Source: 1910 Population Census Schedules
 
357 At least one living individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Source: 1920 Population Census Schedules
 
358 At least one living individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Source: California Death Index, 1940-1997 [database on-line]
 
359 About Family Data Collection - Births
The Family Data Collection - Births database was created while gathering genealogical data for use in the study of human genetics and disease. Compiling data for genetic research does not require the same type of documentation as traditional genealogical research. The genes themselves verify relationships and qualify or disqualify a person from a particular study. Citing the source of every genealogical fact in the electronic gene pool was deemed unnecessary and cost prohibitive by medical researchers. Millions of individual records were created from birth, marriage and death records; obituaries; probate records; books of remembrance; family histories; genealogies; family group sheets; pedigree charts; and other sources. The records collected that did not fit a specific study became the project's by-products and were schedule to be discarded. After viewing the quality of the source material used to create the gene pool and despite the absence of cited documentation, the electronic rights to the data were purchased, rather than see it destroyed.
After initially posting the Family Data Collection database in July of 2000, it was decided to divide the database into three separate collections of Births, Marriages and Deaths. By so doing it was possible to standardize place names and delete duplicates. This process also allowed us to add some additional records that were not included in the first launch of the database. This data covers the entire U.S. for a wide expanse of years. At a minimum, each record contains an individual's name, date and place of event, and the name of related parties. Use this database as a finding tool, just as you would any other secondary source. When you find the name of an ancestor listed, confirm the facts in original sources, such as birth, marriage, and death records, church records, census enumerations, and probate records for the place where the even took place. 
Source: Family Data Collection - Births [database on-line]
 
360 About Family Data Collection - Marriages
The Family Data Collection - Marriages database was created while gathering genealogical data for use in the study of human genetics and disease. Compiling data for genetic research does not require the same type of documentation as traditional genealogical research. The genes themselves verify relationships and qualify or disqualify a person from a particular study. Citing the source of every genealogical fact in the electronic gene pool was deemed unnecessary and cost prohibitive by medical researchers. Millions of individual records were created from birth, marriage and death records; obituaries; probate records; books of remembrance; family histories; genealogies; family group sheets; pedigree charts; and other sources. The records collected that did not fit a specific study became the project's by-products and were schedule to be discarded. After viewing the quality of the source material used to create the gene pool and despite the absence of cited documentation, the electronic rights to the data were purchased ,rather than see it destroyed.
After initially posting the Family Data Collection database in July of 2000, it was decided to separate the database into three separate collections of Births, Marriages and Deaths. By so doing it was possible to standardize place names and delete duplicates. This process also allowed us to add some additional records that were not included in the first launch of the database. This data covers the entire U.S. for a wide expanse of years. At a minimum, each record contains an individual's name, date and place of event, and the name of related parties. Use this database as a finding tool, just as you would any other secondary source. When you find the name of an ancestor listed, confirm the facts in original sources, such as birth, marriage, and death records, church records, census enumerations, and probate records for the place where the even took place. 
Source: Family Data Collection - Marriages [database on-line]
 
361 About Family Data Collection - Deaths
The Family Data Collection - Deaths database was created while gathering genealogical data for use in the study of human genetics and disease. Compiling data for genetic research does not require the same type of documentation as traditional genealogical research. The genes themselves verify relationships and qualify or disqualify a person from a particular study. Citing the source of every genealogical fact in the electronic gene pool was deemed unnecessary and cost prohibitive by medical researchers. Millions of individual records were created from birth, marriage and death records; obituaries; probate records; books of remembrance; family histories; genealogies; family group sheets; pedigree charts; and other sources. The records collected that did not fit a specific study became the project's by-products and were schedule to be discarded. After viewing the quality of the source material used to create the gene pool and despite the absence of cited documentation, the electronic rights to the data were purchased, rather than see it destroyed.
After initially posting the Family Data Collection database in July of 2000, it was decided to divide the database into three separate collections of births, marriages, and deaths. By so doing it was possible to standardize place names and delete duplicates. This process also allowed us to add some additional records that were not included in the first launch of the database. This data covers the entire U.S. for a wide expanse of years. At a minimum, each record contains an individual's name, date and place of event, and the name of related parties. Use this database as a finding tool, just as you would any other secondary source. When you find the name of an ancestor listed, confirm the facts in original sources, such as birth, marriage, and death records, church records, census enumerations, and probate records for the place where the even took place. 
Source: Family Data Collections - Deaths [database on-line]
 
362 At least one living individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Source: Hattie Mabel Pittman funeral card. Dec 1965. Privately held by Carole Thomas.
 
363 The database contains:
Crawford County Marriages 1828-1897
Franklin County Marriages 1819-1897 and 1914-1921
Iron County Marriages 1857-1927 by Eugene Camden, Virginia Brown, Jeanette McClure
Jefferson County Marriages 1826-1890
plus Colored Marriages 1866-1878
St. Francois County Marriages 1818-1908
Ste. Genevieve County Marriages 1723-1890 by Roger Tucker
Washington County Marriages 1815-1937
plus Black Only with Births 1865-1875
 
Source: Missouri Marriage Look Ups - www.vienici.com
 
364 Original data:
Montana. Montana State Death Registry Index, 1907-1953. Montana State Genealogical Society, Montana.
State of Montana. Montana Death Index, 1954-2002. State of Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services, Office of Vital Statistics, Helena, Montana.
About Montana Death Index, 1907-2002
This database is an index to death records for the state of Montana from 1907 to 2002. It also includes a few pre-1900 records and some from 1900 to 1907. Information contained in this index includes:
Deceased's name
Gender
Age at time of death
Death date
Death place
Index/File number
Father's name
Mother's name
Martial Status
Source (Which agency that portion of the index was obtained from. See below for full source citations)
Occasionally there will also be other comments. The index number refers to the death record number assigned by the Montana State Vital Statistics. This number is needed in order to obtain a copy of a death certificate from the office of Vital Statistics. All of the above listed items will not be available for each individual.
With the information provided in this index you may be able to obtain a death certificate. Death certificates can be very valuable because of the amount of information they provide (see extended description). Applications for copies of death certificates should be sent to the Office of Vital Statistics at the following address:
Office of Vital Statistics
Department of Public Health and Human Services
111 N Sanders Rm 209
PO Box 4210
Helena MT 59604
Vital Records in Montana:
Prior to 1895 there were no legal requirements for keeping birth records in Montana. In 1895 the legislative assembly passed a law requiring physicians and midwives to keep a register of all births. All pre-1907 birth records are filed with county clerk in the county where the child was born. Montana began recording births and deaths on the state level in 1907. It was not until about 1915 that mandatory registration of births became more complete. By 1922 about 90 percent of the births were being registered.
The 1895 law governing births also pertained to deaths. At that time the registration of deaths was the responsibility of clergymen, coroners, physicians, sextons, and undertakers. Registration of deaths on the state level began in 1907. By 1910 the registration of deaths reached about 90 percent. It was not until about 1915 that the registration of Montana deaths became reasonably complete.
Taken from Radford, Dwight A., "Montana," in Ancestry's Red Book, ed. Alice Eichholz (Salt Lake City: Ancestry, 1992).
Death Certifcates:
Modern (post-1910) death records, though comparatively recent, are steadily increasing in value. People are living longer, and death records often provide information about birth as well as death.
Modern death certificates have not been standardized throughout the United States; but, like birth certificates, most of them contain the same types of information. Most contemporary death certificates include the deceased's name, sex, race, date of death, age at the time of death, place of death, date of birth, place of birth, marital status, name of spouse, social security number, occupation, residence, father's name, mother's name, cause of death, and place of burial. Records from some states provide the birthplace of the deceased's parents. The social security number is not always included but when it is, it can be invaluable because other records (subject to right-of-privacy laws) may be accessible if you have the social security number.
As any experienced researcher knows, death records are only as accurate as the knowledge of the person who provided the information. Many informants are unaware of the names of parents or are unsure about dates and places of birth. Always try to find additional information about parents and dates and places of birth whenever possible.
Taken from Cerny, Johni, "Research in Birth, Death, and Cemetery Records." In The Source: A Guidebook of American Genealogy, ed. Loretto Dennis Szucs and Sandra Hargreaves Luebking (Salt Lake City: Ancestry, 1997). 
Source: Montana Death Index, 1907-2002 [database on-line]
 
365 Tjibbele Miedema, translator Source: Notes on Reitsma Family Compiled from Old Letters and Mourning Cards
 
366 The eighth federal census of the United States began on 1 June 1860. Census takers were given five months to complete the enumeration. They were instructed to list individuals who died after the first day of the enumeration and to not include children born after that first day. However, it is important to remember that sometimes the enumerator disregarded this instruction. This census gives the age, sex, color, occupation (for males over 15), value of real estate, and birthplace (state in the US or foreign country) of every individual. It also includes whether the individual attended school that year, married within the year, could read or write, or was deaf-mute, blind, "insane," or "idiotic."This was the first census to ask for the value of personal estates. It is thought that many did not reveal the true value of their estates for fear of being taxed accordingly. Census takers were to fill in a state or territory for the birthplace for each individual. If the individual was not born in the United States, the country was to be given--except for Germany and Great Britain. Specific provinces or countries within Germany and Great Britain were to be used instead. For Germany: Baden, Bavaria, Hesse-Darmstadt and Prussia. For Great Britain: England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales. Native Americans living on reservations or unsettled tracts of land were not included in this enumeration. Slaves were enumerated separately, on a slave schedule. This schedule did not list each slaves' name, but it did give the sex and age of every slave, the owner, how many were released from slavery and whether a fugitive or not. Source: Population Schedules of the Eighth Census of the United States
 
367 This is an important census because it shows family movement after the Civil War. It also infers the loss of individuals of military age who may have died in the war. There are microfilming problems with the 1870 census. Some schedules are extremely light and are often difficult to read. Some schedules are missing for the states of Arkansas, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, Texas, Utah, and Vermont. Because of the length of time it took to enumerate the United States, some families were listed twice because they may have moved during that time period from one state to another. For each family, relationships are implied on this census and not confirmed, which can lead to inaccurate supposition. Other relatives listed with the family in the census can help identify the maiden name of the mother, and also identify the surnames of married daughters. Cousins, aunts, uncles, grandparents, in-laws, and other family members listed with their relationships give great clues to unraveling the family. If your family has a male as head of household between the ages of 20-40 and there are children under 10, this can indicate that this family may remain as a unit for the next 20 or 30 years. Because of so much movement during this time period, once you have found your family in the census, search histories, biographies, land and property records and probate records. This is an important census, also, for African-American genealogy research because it is the first census in which all African-Americans were enumerated, individually, on the regular census schedule. African-American families often assumed the surnames of their previous owners. Source: Population Schedules of the Ninth Census of the United States
 
368 Burgerlijke Stand Friesland, geboorten 1811-1902
Database Gemeenten Omvang Laatste
wijzigingen
Regio 1 Vlieland, Terschelling, Ameland en Schiermonnikoog 18.546 24-07-2007
Regio 2 Westdongeradeel, Oostdongeradeel en Dokkum 49.997 24-07-2007
Regio 3 Ferwerderadeel, Dantumadeel en Kollumerland c.a. 62.619 24-07-2007
Regio 4 Tietjerksteradeel en Achtkarspelen 53.780 24-07-2007
Regio 5 Smallingerland en Opsterland 56.514 24-07-2007
Regio 6 Weststellingwerf en Ooststellingwerf 53.871 24-07-2007
Regio 7 Utingeradeel, Haskerland, Aengwirden en Schoterland 68.993 24-07-2007
Regio 8 Menaldumadeel, Baarderadeel, Leeuwarderadeel, Rauwerderhem en Idaarderadeel 79.556 24-07-2007
Regio 9 Leeuwarden 70.208 24-07-2007
Regio 10 Harlingen, Barradeel en Het Bildt 71.259 24-07-2007
Regio 11 Franekeradeel, Franeker, Hennaarderadeel en Wonseradeel 74.269 24-07-2007
Regio 12 Bolsward, Wymbritseradeel, Sneek en IJlst 71.641 24-07-2007
Regio 13 Workum, Hindeloopen, Hemelumer Oldeferd, Stavoren, Gaasterland, Sloten, Doniawerstal en Lemsterland
66.795
24-07-2007



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Burgerlijke Stand Friesland, huwelijken 1811-1922
Database Gemeenten Omvang Laatste
wijzigingen
Regio 1 Vlieland, Terschelling, Ameland en Schiermonnikoog 5.675
24-07-2007
Regio 2 Westdongeradeel*, Oostdongeradeel* en Dokkum* 15.950 24-07-2007
Regio 3 Ferwerderadeel, Dantumadeel* en Kollumerland c.a.* 20.311 24-07-2007
Regio 4 Tietjerksteradeel en Achtkarspelen 17.587 24-07-2007
Regio 5 Smallingerland en Opsterland* 18.246 24-07-2007
Regio 6 Weststellingwerf* en Ooststellingwerf 16.834 24-07-2007
Regio 7 Utingeradeel, Haskerland, Aengwirden en Schoterland 21.635 24-07-2007
Regio 8 Menaldumadeel, Baarderadeel, Leeuwarderadeel, Rauwerderhem en Idaarderadeel 26.935 24-07-2007
Regio 9 Leeuwarden* 24.511 24-07-2007
Regio 10 Harlingen*, Barradeel* en Het Bildt 21.897 24-07-2007
Regio 11 Franekeradeel, Franeker*, Hennaarderadeel en Wonseradeel* 24.325 24-07-2007
Regio 12 Bolsward*, Wymbritseradeel*, Sneek* en IJlst 22.898 24-07-2007
Regio 13 Workum, Hindeloopen, Hemelumer Oldeferd*, Stavoren, Gaasterland, Sloten, Doniawerstal* en Lemsterland*

* nog niet aangevuld met wederzijdse ouders, leeftijden en geboorteplaatsen bruid/bruidegom
20.542
24-07-2007



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Burgerlijke Stand Friesland, overlijden 1811-1942
Database Gemeenten Omvang Laatste
wijzigingen
Regio 1 Vlieland, Terschelling, Ameland en Schiermonnikoog 16.205 20-07-2007
Regio 2 Westdongeradeel, Oostdongeradeel en Dokkum 46.617 20-07-2007
Regio 3 Ferwerderadeel, Dantumadeel en Kollumerland c.a. 58.994 20-07-2007
Regio 4 Tietjerksteradeel en Achtkarspelen 49.309 20-07-2007
Regio 5 Smallingerland en Opsterland 49.851 20-07-2007
Regio 6 Weststellingwerf en Ooststellingwerf 45.222 20-07-2007
Regio 7 Utingeradeel, Haskerland, Aengwirden, Schoterland en Heerenveen 62.656 20-07-2007
Regio 8 Menaldumadeel, Baarderadeel. Leeuwarderadeel, Rauwerderhem en Idaarderadeel 73.924 20-07-2007
Regio 9 Leeuwarden 85.749 20-07-2007
Regio 10 Harlingen, Barradeel en Het Bildt 66.586 20-07-2007
Regio 11 Franekeradeel, Franeker, Hennaarderadeel en Wonseradeel 69.886 20-07-2007
Regio 12 Bolsward, Wymbritseradeel, Sneek en IJlst 69.767 20-07-2007
Regio 13 Workum, Hindeloopen, Stavoren, Hemelumer Oldeferd, Gaasterland, Sloten, Doniawerstal en Lemsterland 58.728 20-07-2007





--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


DTBL Friesland, "BS" vr 1812: huwelijken
Database Gemeenten Omvang Laatste
wijzigingen
Regio 1 Vlieland, Terschelling, Ameland en Schiermonnikoog 6.575
07-06-2007
Regio 2 Westdongeradeel, Oostdongeradeel en Dokkum 28.089 07-06-2007
Regio 3 Ferwerderadeel, Dantumadeel en Kollumerland c.a. 11.913 07-06-2007
Regio 4 Tietjerksteradeel en Achtkarspelen 12.863 07-06-2007
Regio 5 Smallingerland en Opsterland 13.207 07-06-2007
Regio 6 Weststellingwerf en Ooststellingwerf 5.913 07-06-2007
Regio 7 Utingeradeel, Haskerland, Aengwirden en Schoterland 15.768 07-06-2007
Regio 8 Menaldumadeel, Baarderadeel, Leeuwarderadeel, Rauwerderhem en Idaarderadeel 28.129 07-06-2007
Regio 9 Leeuwarden 88.160 07-06-2007
Regio 10 Harlingen, Barradeel en Het Bildt 41.107 07-06-2007
Regio 11 Franekeradeel, Franeker, Hennaarderadeel en Wonseradeel 40.050 07-06-2007
Regio 12 Bolsward, Wymbritseradeel, Sneek en IJlst 50.593 07-06-2007
Regio 13 Workum, Hindeloopen, Hemelumer Oldeferd, Stavoren, Gaasterland, Sloten, Doniawerstal en Lemsterland 28.638 07-06-2007


laatste update van deze lijst: 25 juli 2007 
Source: Search from 1811 on information about births (1811-1902), marriages (1811-1922) and deaths (1811-1942) from the Register of Births, Deaths and Marriages, as well as data on marriages prior to 1812 (DTBL).
 
369 At least one living individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Source: Social Security Death Index [database on-line]
 
370 At least one living individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Source: South Carolina will transcripts, 1782-1868 (Microcopy No.9). Digital images.
 
371 At least one living individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Source: United States, 1930 Federal Census: Population Schedules
 
372 Original data: United States, Selective Service System. World War I Selective Service System Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration. M1509, 4,582 rolls
About World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918
In 1917 and 1918, approximately 24 million men living in the United States completed a World War I draft registration card. These registration cards represent approximately 98% of the men under the age of 46. The total U.S. population in 1917-1918 was about 100 million individuals. In other words, close to 25% of the total population is represented in these records.
The WWI draft registration cards database can be an extremely useful resource because it covers a significant portion of the U.S. male population in the early twentieth-century. If you had family in the United States during WWI, you are likely to find at least one relative's information within this large collection. In addition, these cards contain more than just names and dates; they contain significant genealogical information such as birthplace, citizenship status, and information on the individual's nearest relative. 
Source: World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918 [database on-line].
 

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